5 Best Campsites To Visit This Summer

5 Breathtaking Locations To Pitch A Tent

January is the start of the New Year and the New You. We all make resolutions to better ourselves that we will forget by February. Don’t worry; we are just as guilty. Instead of making so many resolutions, we like to use January to start planning our summers. We want to max out the fun outdoors. With limited weekends to dedicate to camping trips, we want to find the best location to take in all the beauty the outdoors has to offer. With that in mind we want to blow your minds with these 5 breathtaking locations to pitch a tent.

Northwest

5 Best Campsites To Visit This Summer

Big Island State Park – Eastsound, WA

Blind Island State Park:
Blind Island is a small, three-acre marine camping park located near the entrance of Blind Bay at Shaw Island which is off the west coast of Washington. This island includes 1,280-feet of saltwater and rocky shoreline with no fresh water available. This island is for primitive campers who can only commute to the campsite by human or wind-powered watercrafts. Don’t worry, the effort is not wasted with unbelievable views and hiking trails throughout the island.

Things To Do:
Since there is no commercial crab fishing allowed in the area, crab fishing can produce some spectacular results. Be aware of shellfish regulations and have your shellfish permits and catch record displayed when you set crab traps. The beach is also a great place to find shells once the tide is low.

Place To Eat:
This campsite is for the primitive camper, so the best place to eat is at the beach after you caught some fresh crabs.

Southwest

5 Best Campsites To Visit This Summer

Kaibab National Forest – Jacob Lake, AZ

Crazy Jug Point:
After traveling down 27 miles of soft dirt roads, you arrive at a campsite like no other. Crazy Jug Point offers an edge-of-the-canyon car camping experience with breathtaking panoramic views of the Colorado River. The river comes out from behind the Powell Plateau, wraps around Great Thumb Mesa and winds far downstream as far as the eye can see.

Things To Do:
Descend Bill Hall two miles to the broad Esplanad. Hear you can see Mt. Trumbull and the rest of the Uinkaret Mountains while hearing the roar of Thunder River that burst from the canyon wall.

Place To Eat:
Jacob Lake Inn located in Fredonia, AZ maybe 2.5 hours away from Crazy Jug Point, but it is the last place to eat before you head into camp. Baked fresh breads, pies, rolls, and cakes have been a tradition at Jacob Lake Inn since 1923.

Midwest

5 Best Campsites To Visit This Summer

Apostle Islands – La Pointe, WI

Devils Island:
Twenty-one islands on the west end of Lake Superior in northern Wisconsin make an archipelago landmark that is the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore. These islands are only explored by boat or sea kayak. The islands remain so beautiful and pristine, thanks to the limitation of transportation and designating 80 percentage of the national lakeshore to wilderness. The 21 islands offer 12 miles of mainland with a unique blend of cultural and natural resources. If you want a unique secluded campsite, Devils Island is perfect.  Devils Island has only one campsite, so you have the whole island of  rugged, rocky shoreline and sand swept landscape all to yourself. It is a ways out in the islands so we’d suggest honing your sea kayak skills or hitching a ride out there on a charter boat.

Things To Do:
Island hoping by sea kayak to explore the sea caves, trails and lighthouses spread out among the islands is an incredible way to see the area. On a clear day you can even see the Sawtooth Mountains in Minnesota.

Place To Eat:
The Candy Shoppe is a staple in Bayfield, Wisconsin for all the sweet tooth lovers out there. Stop in to get their homemade Wine Bread or ice cream, they are both to die for. You can even buy extra to take with you camping.

South

5 Best Campsites To Visit This Summer

Ozark National Forest – Yellville, AR

Spring Lake Campground:
The Ozark National Forest covers 1.2 million acres in the Ozark Mountains of Northern Arkansas. If you want to be surrounded by natural beauty, then Spring Lake Campground is your destination. It is hard to beat the surrounding beauty of this campsite with a captivating forest, large natural pool and steep sandstone bluffs of the Buffalo river. The two-mile loop of hiking trails help you take it all in – leading you through the scenic hardwood forests where wildflowers generally bloom year-round.

Things To Do:
If you want to get on the water, there is a great float trip between the entrance point at Maumee South and the Spring Creek campsites. Put the canoe in at Maumee and float the 5.3 miles down the beautiful Buffalo River to the Spring Creek campsite area. If water is not your thing, the Blanchard Springs Caverns are only 30 minutes away and offer tours of the incredible cave system.

Place To Eat:
The family owned Neighbors Mill serves up home cooking from breakfast to dinner. The legendary Chicken Salad Sandwich is always a good choice as they make all of their bread in house. Their pumpkin muffins are a hit around breakfast time.

East

5 Best Campsites To Visit This Summer

Acadia National Park – Southwest Harbor, ME

Seawall Campsite:
Many campers who live on the East Coast know a trip to Acadia National Park is hard to beat. This park offers amazing views of towering mountains that frame the jagged Atlantic Coast. If you want to get away from the crowd and really enjoy the beauty of the park, then Seawall Campground is where you want to pitch your tent. Seawall Campground is located on the west side of Mount Desert Island, four miles south of Southwest Harbor. Named after the amazing natural seawall close by, this campground has fantastic rustic campsites in their D loop.

Things To Do:
Hiking the scenic Wonderland Trail and Ship Harbor Trail is fun for the whole family. There are many great views and opportunities to see wildlife on both trials. The scenic Bass Harbor Head Lighthouse is just off Route 102A.

Best Place To Eat:
The Seawall Picnic Area lets you see a view of the half-mile of cobble seawall that forms a natural barrier between land and sea. This experience raises the bar for a picnic.

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